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[833] Heads in Bed – Jacob Tomsky

1carered

“Service is not about being up-front and honest. Service is about minimizing negatives and creating the illusion of perfection.” (43)

Heads in Bed is the funny at sometimes galling memoir of an indiscreet veteran of the (so-called) hospitality industry. (I pick this up because of the alluring subject matter, and the recent shocking revelation that some hotels do not change the bed sheets after checkouts.) It tells the tale of how a jobless philosophy major worked his way up the industry ladder, beginning as a rubber-burning parking valet in New Orleans and then making his way into the “hotel proper.” From bellman to concierge, housekeeping to front desk, Tomsky doles out stories of transactions that involve high degree of cupidity and dishonesty on both guests’ and hotels’ behalf. Guests come up with ways to get something for nothing—room upgrade or complimentary minibars. Hotels encourage staff members to cosset guests in every conceivable way but cut corners in the the staff’s benefits.

Tomsky’s keen depiction on workers and how a nickel and dime make a huge different in their cutthroat jobs rivets the pages. The competition for tips is fierce and so real. Tomsky is fratty, snarky, brass, but industry-specific, revealing insider scoops of the industry that savvy travelers would have gathered. He confirms the pecking order of hotel guests according to their bookings. His many anecdotes show constant cordiality is taxing, but there’s no arguing the fact that the infinite stream of guests makes for good fodder. One point that truly resonates with me is: A person of culture should make every effort to hide his frustration from those who had nothing to do with its origin.

366 pp. Anchor Books. Pocket Paper. [Read|Skim|Toss] [Buy|Borrow]

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