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Sex Gone Bad

anoeye

My good friend in Hong Kong asked me to bring a couple books for him when I go visit in January. Two authors I have never heard of piqued my interest. Kevin Barry is one. His City of Bohane is set in the year 2053, in a world with minimal technology. It received largely positive reviews and won the 2013 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. After a quick skim through the book I feel that Barry’s vernacular, like his plot, is a wonderful blend of past, present and imagined future. What piques me even more is nancy Huston, who scooped the least coveted book award of the year, the Literary Review’s Bad Sex prize, for her 14th novel, Infrared, about a woman who likes to snap her lovers in the throes of passion. I have never heard of the dubious award, nor the Canadian author who was too shy to attend the ceremony. You can read the article from Guardian.

Literary Review is well known for its annual Bad Sex in Fiction Award. Each year since 1993, Literary Review presents the annual Bad Sex in Fiction Award to the author who produces the worst description of a sex scene in a novel. The award itself is in the form of a “semi-abstract trophy representing sex in the 1950s”, which depicts a naked woman draped over an open book. The award was originally established by Rhoda Koenig, a literary critic, and Auberon Waugh, then the magazine’s editor. The given rationale is “to draw attention to the crude, tasteless, often perfunctory use of redundant passages of sexual description in the modern novel, and to discourage it”. Have you read any of the winners?

One Response

  1. I haven’t read any of them, and I’m ashamed/glad to say I haven’t heard of many of them. Why, do you recommend any despite the bad sex?

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