• Current Reads

      Life after Life Jill McCorkle
      This Is Your Captain Speaking Jon Methven
      The Starboard Sea Amber Dermont
      Snark David Denby
      Bring Up the Bodies Hilary Mantel
  • Popular Tags

  • Recent Reflections

  • Categories

  • Moleskine’s All-Time Favorites

  • Echoes

    Matthew on [825] Paradise Lost -John…
    Anokatony on [825] Paradise Lost -John…
    Matthew on The King’s English Books…
    Katie Marie on The King’s English Books…
    lazyhaze on Reading Kafka’s “T…
    Buried In Print on Reading Kafka’s “T…
  • Reminiscences

  • Blog Stats

    • 991,710 hits
  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,666 other followers

Extra: Under the Tree?

Matt 139

Happy Holidays! Picture taken at the Christmas tree in the Castro.

When Christmas carols were within earshot last night on the street, it occurred to me that readers have their traditions too. With just a week left in 2012, and Christmas celebrations and festivities descending upon me, I doubt I will get to all these books but I’ll share the list anyway.

Little Boy Lost by Marghanita Laski. Hilary Wainwright, poet and intellectual, is enduring a grim wartime Christmas at his stiflingly suburban mother’s house when a Frenchman, Pierre, turns up to give him news of the small son that he had to leave in occupied France. After the war, Hilary returns to a blasted and impoverished France in order to trace the child.

Dickens at Christmas by Charles Dickens. It is said that Charles Dickens invented Christmas, and within these pages you’ll certainly find all the elements of a quintessential traditional Christmas brought to vivid life. Nuff said.

The Dog Stars by Peter Heller. This is the story of Hig, his dog Jasper, and his plane, as they discover life after the end of the world. Since the end of the world didn’t happen, I can now put this book back on my list.

Hawthorn & Child by Keith Ridgway. A few people have recommended this book to me. This is a detective novel in which the mysteries of people’s lives threaten to overshadow mysteries born of criminal activity. The crime that gives the novel its initial momentum fades away like the half-glimpsed vintage car, never to reappear.

The Lighthouse by Alison Moore. A debut novel from a high-achieving independent publisher, The Lighthouse has surprised some observers with its place on the Man Booker Prize shortlist. Disquieting, deceptive, crafted with a sly and measured expertise, Alison Moore’s story could certainly deliver a masterclass in slow-burn storytelling to those splashier literary celebs who take more pains over a pyrotechnic paragraph than a watertight plot.

4 Responses

  1. Have a merry Christmas.

  2. Merry Christmas, Matt!

  3. Matt, Hope you had a wonderful Christmas with family and friends, or perhaps some extra quiet time with a good book that you really enjoyed.

  4. Merry Christmas! I got Little Boy Lost last year and haven’t read it yet, so I’ll be interested to see what you think!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: